Leaving School – teach yourself how to type

Liverpool's Kenny Dalglish scores in to the Kop end at Anfield I lived in a council house on the ring road in Liverpool (Queens Drive) – and had very supportive parents (although I might not have thought so at the time). I went to a Catholic Boys’ Grammar School, St Francis Xavier’s – I and was very religious (up until the moment I was 18 – and then never went to church again!).

By the age of 18, I was sick and tired of academic life – and just wanted to get on and work. I was the only boy in our sixth form not to apply to go to University. I had the grades – but decided to undertake a vocational course in Press Photography for a year. Before that, I’d had to make some difficult career decisions. I had a large model railway set and thought a career as an engineer might be interesting. Tempered with that, I had a keen interest in photography. Luckily, I decided to sell my model railway set – and buy a better camera!

Mike Lyons and Dave Bennett do battle at Maine Road Once I’d decided to follow a career as a press photographer, I really did not apply myself to A Level studies. I could not see the relevance. However, I did want to learn relevant skills – and I made one of the best decisions of my life … to learn how to touch type. I spent many hours (when I should have been revising for my A Levels) sitting at my sister’s old typewriter in my room teaching myself to type. It’s a skill I still use today – and think it’s essential for any youngster to learn. I am sure that access to computer keyboards will make it a more natural skill for this generation of youngsters.

Football Fan with dart in neck at Anfield In pursuing my love of photography – the dream was to be able to photograph Liverpool FC at Anfield. It was virtually impossible to get access as a photographer (still is today). A friendly photographer at the Liverpool Echo tipped me off that a paper called “The News Line” wanted a photographer to shoot the first 10 minutes of each match on colour film – in return for a photographer’s pass. “The News Line” is the newspaper of the Workers Revolution Party (WRP) – and at the time was the only colour daily newspaper in the UK. I didn’t ever read the paper – but was always very proud of my colour picture on the back page after a Liverpool or Everton match. One of the pictures I took – of a fan with a dart in his neck – ended up being named on of the 100 best football pictures of all time. I bet the WRP would be surprised at the help they gave to my career!

More Projects
Leaving School – teach yourself how to type
Digging for Gold – ac...

In the late 1990s, there was pressure within the sports photo industry from sports rights holders (the likes of the FA Premier League, the IOC and individual football clubs). These rights holders could not see the value of photography agencies and individual photographers being given free and unrestricted access to sports events. Rights holders got […]

Leaving School – teach yourself how to type
Star Balls – the star...

In 1992, I was approached by Peter Robinson, FIFA’s Official Photographer for many years – and a personal friend. He had been asked to find a photographer to work with UEFA and TEAM Marketing on their new concept of the UEFA Champions League. He felt as FIFA’s photographer, he could not get involved – and […]

Leaving School – teach yourself how to type
Hanging up the camera…

In the autumn of 1994, I decided to “hang up my cameras”. EMPICS was growing as a business – and it needed me at base. I’d tried to bring in senior managers to take on my role – but that was not successful (probably my fault rather than theirs). I also felt it was time […]

Leaving School – teach yourself how to type
Funemployment – being...

I first heard the term “funemployment” back in 2009. There was an article in the LA Times that summed up the “situation” I was in after selling my business, EMPICS. It had been a challenge to give an answer when, in your 40s, and people ask politely what you do – or forms arrive that […]

Leaving School – teach yourself how to type
Charity begins at Home R...

The sale of EMPICS and our departure from the business coincided with a move to a new village. Knipton is at the centre of the Belvoir Estate – an area of 16,000 acres owned but the Duke of Rutland. The rural idyll is nice – but with so much private land, there are limited public […]